tick removal banner, picture of Sutherland

Ticks on Humans

tick on human

Whilst ticks usually are attracted to dogs and cats and pets etc, they are quite happy to sink their mouths into humans. The 1st time one got me was after I'd been sitting beside my dog in our campervan. I've been lucky, and haven't been infected.

Several years back, we thought that Lyme disease wasn't present in the UK. Now we know it is, and several cases are reported each year. We can hardly put tick prevention treatment on ourselves, and there are no vaccines available in the UK at present.

Management and Prevention of ticks is therefore the key for us.

How to remove a tick from a person

Again the tick twister is the best tool for the job. Simply put the hook between the tick and the skin and TWIST. .....>more about tick twisters here

And see all our tick removal tools here

Check yourself over regularly when you've been out and about, and check all the awkward places - especially before you go to bed. It's useful too , if you have someone who can check your back, and behind your legs. When you're bitten, you won't feel a thing, so you won't know if a tick's bitten you. Have a really good check in your hair too. Remember ticks are tiny, and are easily missed.

Tick Prevention and Protection for people

When tick season is in full flow, don't go sitting in the heather or overgrowth to have your picnic - be sensible. And when you are out and about, wear long trousers tucked in or with gaitors. Keep tops tucked into your trousers too.

Check yourself over especially after you've stopped for a rest or a bite to eat.

Unfortunately ticks get into our gardens too. Think about how you use your garden, and where ticks may come from. Is your garden deer free? Birds and rabbits can bring ticks in too. Think about where they may travel, and especially with bird tables etc, keep these in a separate area from where you may relax in your garden. Keeping the grass short, and having pathways in between the bushes and plants in borders may help too.

smidge tick and midge repellent

Tick Borne Diseases

For information on Lyme Disease, Borreliosis etc, please follow the links on our tick links page.